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Mission and Values OUR MISSION Our mission is to treat people with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases with a global approach including education, prevention, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up; to offer palliative care services to people at the end of their life to alleviate their suffering; to offer a homelike environment to people with serious chronic conditions. OUR VISION It’s not just about care, it’s about caring.
It’s not just about patients, it’s about people.
It’s not just about human beings, it’s about being human.
It’s not just about meeting standards, it’s about raising standards.
This credo still governs every aspect of our institution. In terms of our vision for the coming years, it translates into the following imperatives: The Mount Sinai Hospital Centre intends to respond to the changing and complex needs of its patients:
  • By making its pulmonary care and palliative care services centers of excellence, in terms of quality of services, patient safety and risk managment, all supported by strong research and teaching activities in collaboration with McGill University
  • By organizing, jointly with its regional partners and with McGill University, a genuine continuum of health services based on the concept of “Transitional Care” for pulmonary care and palliative care, for the greatest clinical and human benefit of patients and their families.
OUR VALUES Our values reflect what we, as professionals, volunteers or community members believe in deeply and our commitment to Mount Sinai Hospital Centre’s patients. Respect: central to all human interactions Respect is the recognition that every person is entitled to be treated with dignity, be that person a user, a family member, a volunteer, an employee, an executive or some other participant in the local network. Respect demands reciprocity and must be present in actions, words and behaviors. Respect requires that the dispensation of clinical services takes into account, as much as possible, the interests and choices of the recipients of those services (the user or the client’s family), our professionals and partners. The quest for excellence Excellence is first and foremost based on the quality of services, patient safety and the management of risks both clinical and organizational. It is a duty owed to clients who entrust professionals with their most valuable asset, their health. Hence, the requirement of quality and safety is the focus of all the institution’ activities. Because quality is a multi-dimensional construct, it obviously has positive dimensions, but it is also founded on the unceasing search for and elimination of “non-quality”. This is the business of everyone, the institution’s staff and its users alike. Therapeutic alliance: a shared responsibility This value is aimed at reversing the “producer/consumer” paradigm that is a standard feature of the healthcare world. The underlying principle of this stated value, namely that the preservation and recovery of an individual’s health will be better assured through a “therapeutic alliance”. In other words, through “co-responsibility” assumed by two partners: users (or their legal guardians) and professionals, each making their specific contribution; professionals through their expertise, and users, the ultimate decision-makers respecting their lives, through self-management respecting their will, mental, physical and social possibilities. Importance of human resources Physicians, practitioners, clinicians, support staff and managers are the institution’s primary players. The possibility of excellence resides in all of us and is achievable by constant enhancement, development and the continual recognition of every person’s human and professional skills in a safe, stimulating and open work environment. These are essential conditions to obtain satisfaction at work for each and everyone. Ethics: the driving force of our practice Professional intervention, over and above the obligation to provide care, demands firm ethical insight in the face of physical and mental suffering. This holds true in any situation, but all the more so for dying patients. The institution and its employees are obligated to adopt a highly ethical behavior at all times. Innovation: a mandatory challenge The best care requires constantly renewed therapeutic processes given the increasing complexity of cases. In addition to that obligation is the need to deal with unceasing technological change and the evolving expectations and needs of users. All this continually challenges Mount Sinai’s institutional processes and the nature of its intervention methods and calls for a permanent commitment to innovating practices.